12 of the best LGBTQ shows you can watch right now on NOW TV

Need a new queer series to watch? We got you sis.

Like Amazon Prime and Netflix, NOW TV is slowly becoming one of the most reliable streaming services for queer content, with an incredibly diverse range of iconic programmes that can’t be viewed elsewhere.

Because we’re in lockdown, we’ve rounded up 12 of the best LGBTQ shows that you can watch right now on the platform, from romantic dramas like Looking and The L Word: Generation Q to fantasy epics such as True Blood and Game of Thrones.

Grab a (bottle of) wine, microwave that popcorn and… relax. Oh, and if a 10+ episode television series isn’t your thing, then check out 14 queer films that can also viewed on the streaming service here. Like we said, WE GOT YOU.

Broad City (2014 – 2019)

Cast: Ilana Glazer, Abbi Jacobson, Hannibal Buress, Paul W. Downs, Arturo Castro, John Gemberling

Developed from their independent web series of the same name, Broad City stars Ilana Glazer and Abbi Jacobson as two Jewish-American women in their twenties as they navigate modern life in New York City. They’re often assisted by Ilana’s love interest and dentist, Lincoln (Hannibal Buress), Abbi’s enthusiastic boss Trey (Paul W. Downs), their dramatic friend Jaimé (Arturo Castro) and Abbi’s slacker roommate Bevers (John Gemberling). The series received universal critical acclaim and was commended for its progressive representation of the LGBTQ experience; both characters explore queer relationships throughout its five-season run and don’t feel the need to define their sexuality. Broad City is widely considered one of the funniest shows of the 21st century and one of the greatest comedy series of all time.

The Comeback (2005, 2014)

Cast: Lisa Kudrow, Damian Young, Robert Michael Morris, Laura Silverman, Malin Åkerman, Lance Barber, Robert Bagnall

The Comeback was far too ahead of its time. The iconic HBO series starred Emmy-winner Lisa Kudrow as Valerie Cherish, a washed up sitcom actress who lands a role in a new comedy series and chronicles her return to the television industry on a reality show called The Comeback. It first aired in 2005, but was cancelled after one season because audiences just… didn’t get it. In retrospective reviews however, the show has been lauded and is often credited with influencing succeeding meta-sitcoms and satirical comedies. Its impact led to a revival in 2014, which also received unanimous praise from fans and critics. Valerie has since been hailed as one of the greatest television female characters in history, and one of Lisa Kudrow’s finest performances ever (in our opinion, it’s her absolute best – sorry Phoebe Buffay stans). The late Robert Michael Harris was also praised for his role as Valerie’s hairdresser and right-hand man, Mickey.

Game of Thrones (2011 – 2019)

Cast: Emilia Clarke, Kit Harrington, Sophie Turner, Maisie Williams, Peter Dinklage, Lena Headey, Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, Diana Rigg, Alfie Allen, Gwendoline Christie

An adaptation of George R. R. Martin’s renowned fantasy novels A Song of Ice and Fire, Game of Thrones is set on the continents of Westeros and Essos and follows several dynasties and alliances as they vie for the Iron Throne of the Seven Kingdoms. There’s dragons, death and lots of queer romance. The show currently stands as the most nominated in Emmy history, with a total of 161 nominations. The first seven seasons were universally praised for the production value, storylines and the cast’s performances, particularly Emilia Clarke, Kit Harrington, Peter Dinklage, Lena Headey and Diana Rigg. The final season? We don’t talk about that.

Gaycation (2016 – 2017)

Cast: Ellen Page, Ian Daniel

Hosted by Oscar-nominated actress Ellen Page and art curator Ian Daniel, Gaycation explores different LGBTQ cultures around the world. The two visit countries that aren’t known for queer acceptance such as Japan, Brazil and Ukraine and meet with various members of the community to discuss the difficulties of being an LGBTQ citizen. In two specials, Ellen and Ian also talk about the impact of Donald Trump’s administration on the community, and sit down with the individuals affected by the tragic Orlando shooting. The series is highly informative of the treatment of LGBTQ people in non-western countries, so it’s a shame it didn’t run longer than two seasons. We need a show like this more than ever.

Looking (2014 – 2016)

Cast: Jonathan Groff, Frankie J. Alvarez, Murray Bartlett, Lauren Weedman, Russel Tovey, Raúl Castillo

Hailed as a modern take on gay-themed dramas (and as the gay version of Sex and the City and Girls), Looking starred Jonathan Groff, Frankie J. Alvarez and Murray Bartlett as three homosexual men in San Francisco; focusing on their trials and tribulations with life and love. The short-lived HBO series was revolutionary in the way it depicted the LGBTQ community. It portrayed gay men as completely ordinary and the sex scenes felt like a political statement at a time when same-sex marriage was illegal. Although the series received heaps of praise from both critics and the community, Looking was cancelled by HBO after a sharp decline in the ratings. However, with the amount of reboots and revivals occurring in the world of television as of present, we wouldn’t be surprised if Looking came back in a big way next decade.

The L Word: Generation Q (2019 – present)

Cast: Jennifer Beals, Katherine Moenig, Leisha Hailey, Sepideh Moafi, Arienne Mandi, Leo Sheng, Jacqueline Toboni, Rosanny Zayas

The L Word: Generation Q takes place 10 years after the events of the groundbreaking original series and sees the return of Bette (Jennifer Beals) as she makes a bid to be LA’s first lesbian mayor, with the help of Shane (Katherine Moenig) and Alice (Leisha Hailey). The series also introduces us to several new characters: Dani Nùñez (Arienne Mandi), a public relations rep; Micah Lee (Leo Sheng), a trans man and social worker; and Sarah Finley (Jacqueline Toboni), a Catholic woman struggling with her sexuality. It’s one of the most diverse shows on television right now. Generation Q will return for a 10-episode second season later this year.

Modern Family (2009 – present)

Cast: Ed O’Neill, Sofia Vergara, Julie Bowen, Ty Burrell, Jesse Tyler Ferguson, Eric Stonestreet, Sarah Hyland, Ariel Winter, Nolan Gould, Rico Rodriguez, Aubrey Anderson-EmmonsJeremy Maguire

Mockumentary sitcom Modern Family follows the lives of Jay Pritchett (Ed O’Neill) and his extended family, all of whom live in the suburbs of Los Angeles. Like Will & Grace, the show has been credited with helping change the perception of gay characters in popular culture. Although the characters of Mitchell (Jesse Tyler Ferguson) and Cameron (Eric Stonestreet) have been critiqued for being ‘stereotypical gays’ due to their flamboyancy (because for some reason, that’s bad), they’ve been lauded by critics as a stepping stone in the fight for marriage equality, which passed in 2015 in the United States during the show’s 7th season. The two also boast the honour of being the longest-running LGBTQ characters in history, having appeared in 250 episodes over 11 seasons, and the longest-running LGBTQ television couple. Audiences will have to say their farewells to Mitchell and Cameron later this year, as the series airs its final episode on 8 April. 

Nashville (2012 – 2018)

Cast: Connie Britton, Hayden Panettiere, Clare Bowen, Eric Close, Charles Esten, Jonathan Jackson, Sam Palladio, Robert Wisdom, Powers Booth, Chris Carmack

Chronicling the lives of various fictional country music singers in Nashville, Tennessee, the series stars American Horror Story: Murder House alum Connie Britton as legendary country superstar Rayna Jaymes, and focuses on her conflict with a rising younger star Juliette Barnes, played by Hayden Panettiere. The OC’s Chris Carmack co-stars as Will Lexington, another rising star who is dealing with the realisation that he might be gay, with one of his main storylines dealing with homophobia in the country music industry. It ran for six seasons and 124 episodes, all of which are now available to stream on NOW TV.

Six Feet Under (2001 – 2005)

Cast: Peter Krause, Michael C. Hall, Frances Conroy, Lauren Ambrose, Freddy Rodriguez, Mathew St. Patrick, Jeremy Sisto, Rachel Griffiths, James Cromwell, Justina Machado

One of the most acclaimed television dramas of all time, Six Feet Under follows the lives of the Fisher Family, who run a funeral home in Los Angeles. Before he was a forensic blood spatter analyst slash vigilante serial killer on Dexter, Michael C. Hall played one of the most realistic homosexual characters on television. From 2001-2005, he played David Fisher, a socially conservative funeral director who struggles to come to terms with his sexuality. Over the course of five seasons, David learns to find acceptance thanks to his main love interest, Kevin Charles, (Mathew St. Patrick), an openly gay police officer. David and Keith are often credited with helping break down stereotypes about homosexuality and race, and have been lauded as one of the most authentic gay relationships in television history.

Supergirl (2015 – present)

Cast: Melissa Benoist, Mehcad Brooks, Chyler Leigh, Jeremy Jordan, David Harewood, Calista Flockhart, Chris Wood, Floriana Lima, Katie McGrath, Odette Annable, Jesse Rath, Sam Witwer, Nicole Maines

Based on the classic DC Comics character, Supergirl follows the adventures of the title character as she protects the world by thwarting threats from supervillains and intergalactic forces. The show’s fourth season introduced audiences to a new superheroine called Dreamer (Nicole Maines), who boasts powers of precognition and astral projection. The character made history as the first ever transgender superhero on television. An episode in the current fifth season focuses on Dreamer as she’s targeted by a man who wants her to “quit being a superhero” because she of her trans identity. Supergirl may came across as your regular superhero fanfare, but it’s actually one of the most progressive shows on television right now. If you’re a fan of powerful female characters who defeat serial killers, aliens and transphobic scum, then give this a watch.

The Trixie & Katya Show (2017 – 2018)

Cast: Trixie Mattel, Yekaterina Petrovna Zamolodchikova

A spin-off of their YouTube series UNHhhh, The Trixie and Katya Show sees the two sickening fan-favourite contestants of RuPaul’s Drag Race season seven discuss a plethora of important topics such as spirituality, ass, porn, natural disasters and diseases (very fitting right now). Due to personal issues, Katya was replaced with Drag Race season eight winner Bob the Drag Queen for the remaining five episodes.

True Blood (2008 – 2014)

Cast: Anna Paquin, Stephen Moyer, Sam Trammell, Ryan Kwanten, Rutina Wesley, Chris Bauer, Nelsan Ellis, Carrie Preston, Adina Porter, Alexander Skarsgard, Deborah Ann Woll, Anna Camp, Lizzy Caplan, Joe Manganeillo

Set in the fictional town of Bon Temps, Louisiana, True Blood picks up two years after the invention of a synthetic blood product that allows vampires to “come out” of hiding and live in normal society with humans. Oscar-winner and X-Men star Anna Paquin plays lead character Sookie Stackhouse, a waitress who falls in love with a 173-year-old “good” vampire called Bill Compton (Stephen Moyer). The late Nelsan Ellis co-starred as Lafayette, the unapologetically queer short order cook at Sookie’s workplace, Merlotte’s. There’s vampires, a hell of a lot of blood, and more raunchy sex scenes than we can count – straight and queer. Don’t watch this with your mother. Trust us, it’s awkward.

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